Why Rudog is the Right Choice

Why Rudog is the Right Choice

Most of our clients already have a very good understanding of the basics, they just need some help figuring out how to put them into practice or stay focused.

You may be looking for some help understanding and managing:

  • Diabetes or your A1C
  • Hypertension
  • Cholesterol management
  • Inflammatory Bowel or flare ups
  • Anxiety

Maybe you are thinking about bariatric surgery, or are faced with having to do a revision. These are big decisions, and should not be taken lightly. Discipline with your diet is essential to your success. We already work with some of the most respected surgeons in the field of bariatric surgery. We know exactly what you are going through and we have dietitians that specialize in this area. Let us help you experience successful weight loss, healthfully.

Rudog can help you! We take the time to listen to you, answer your questions, and help you understand what to expect. We also take insurance, and many of the conditions listed above are covered by insurance.

If you are looking for supplement recommendations, Rudog is the place to be. We will answer your questions candidly and honestly. We can help you find the right kind of supplements for whatever your unique health or fitness situation is.  We are also your resource for information on CBD supplementation. You probably are curious and we are the perfect place to ask those questions!

For those who are athletes, your Rudog Dietitian will help you understand the significance of your diet to your performance and recovery. You will learn how to adjust your carbs and protein to get the most out of your workouts and minimize injury.  We will also work with you to build a healthy routine of workout, sleep, and recovery.

The Rudog Dietitians are all registered, licensed and clinically trained. They provide customized counseling in many areas including weight loss, diabetes management, post bariatric surgery meal planning, nutrition coaching, menu planning, and more.  We have dietitians that specialize in unique areas such as post bariatric surgery recovery and mixed martial arts.

Thank you for checking us out, we. look forward to working with you. We take many forms of insurance including BCBS, UHC, Cigna, and  some Aetna plans.

Mary Cabral, RD/LD
Owner, Rudog
[email protected]

What about fat in your diet?

Many of the fighters and athletes that I work with really don’t have a good grasp on how much fat they are eating, let alone how much fat they should be eating. They are frequently focusing so much on eating protein or not eating carbs, that the fat content kind of gets ignored. I mentioned in an earlier article that MOST of men who are training full time (2 times a day most days, plus additional cardio) need at least 3000 Kcals.  This is based on an average male body size of 5’10” and 200lbs, with an average age of 28. This is not designed to promote weight loss, but to provide adequate fuel for training and maintaining muscle mass.

For a 3000 kcal diet, a reasonable fat goal would be 20-25%, or 600 – 750 kcals. That’s the equivalent of 66 – 83 fat g/day. This would mean that the carb intake would be around 50-55% and the protein intake around 20-25%.

On diets that are a little higher in protein, they tend to be a little higher in fat. That’s because animal based protein carries with it more fat. For example, a 6oz portion of fairly lean beef is going to have upwards of 42g of fat. The same portion of chicken breast will only have 18-30g fat. The type of meat you select will greatly affect the amount of “fun” fat you can build into the diet. Dairy products are often used as protein sources and they can carry additional fat (especially saturated fat) as well.

It’s also important to point out the if you prefer to use whole grain foods and higher fiber foods, they will typically be a little higher in fat than lower fiber choices. The bran portion of the grain is where the fat content is contained. Cereals (think granola) that are higher in fiber can also be higher in fat because of the nuts they use to boost the fiber. They also cook or roll the granola in oil, be sure to read the label.

It is certainly easy to get too much fat, but you don’t want to be so careful that you don’t get enough. Many of the guys I work with admit that they are afraid to eat fat at all. Here are a few of the problems that can happen if you don’t eat enough fat:

  • You will end up feeling not satisfied. This eventually leads to a “binge” where you seek out pizza or something that has the fat you are craving in it.
  •  Fat in the diet provides a mouth feel that communicates to the brain “this is yummy and I like it it.” It signals the serotonin response that tells your brain you are satisfied and done. If this “trigger” doesn’t happen, your body puts itself on a mission to make it happen.
  • Over time, when there isn’t enough fat in the diet, you put yourself at risk for essential fatty acid deficiency. There are lots of special fats and fat soluble vitamins that are present in fat. When you over restrict fat, you miss out on these. This can cause drying of hair and skin, brittle nails, hair that breaks, and an overall dullness to the skin.

If you are eating a balanced diet (which means adequate carbs, protein and fat) that provides the right amount of calories, and you aren’t going crazy with high fat food choices, your fat intake will be right on target without you having to measure it. However, if you want a little help or affirmation that what you are doing is right for your training goals, just talk to a dietitian  to see what and how you are actually eating. Knowledge is what gives you the power to change.

Mary Cabral, RD/LD
Owner, www.Rudog.com

 

 

NAAN bread. Get some.

NAAN bread. Get some.

Naan BreadTake advantage of the latest hot product at the grocery store – naan. The flatbread, most commonly associated with the cooking of India, is enjoying newfound popularity at the grocery store. Readily available in pre-packaged form, the tear-dropped shape bread comes in flavors such as whole wheat and garlic. Like Boboli before it, naan is the trendiest way to put a new spin on pizza – a blank canvas for whatever the creative cook can dream up.

Dress it up with any combination of ingredients and blanket the whole mixture with cheese or use naan as a platform to showcase melted cheese, much like a grilled cheese sandwich. Try pepper jack, Monterey Jack, provolone or mozzarella combined with other favorites such as Parmesan and Asiago.

In Indian and Central Asian cooking, flatbreads are as common as biscuits and cornbread in the South. Traditionally, naan is baked in a small dried clay oven where a hot fire heats the inside walls. The dough is thrown against the walls where it sticks and bakes. The experienced baker chooses just the right moment to pull it out of the oven – when it’s browned and bubbly – and before it slides onto the ground. The main difference between naan and other flatbreads is in the cooking: a skillet instead of an oven. In some countries, yogurt is added to the flour in naan to soften the texture of the final product.

Although you can serve naan plain, cooks have found a way to pair the ethnic food with a gourmet taste of America, similar to the upscale taco craze. You’ll find naan topped with everything from barbecued chicken and smoked Gouda, to roasted vegetables and Gruyere, to smoked salmon and cream cheese.

Because few of us have a tandoori oven in the backyard, you can slide the naan onto a grill, or you can pop it in the oven. It’s delicious any way you do it.

Fuel to win, naturally.

*Naan bread image from the Food Network.

MMA Snack Ideas by Rudog

MMA Snack Ideas by Rudog

Need a little inspiration on what to eat for snacks throughout the day, or even at night? Here are few ideas to get your brain going.

If you like it COLD

Try some KEFIR, a yogurt drink. It comes in several flavors, plus a plain version. Drink it by itself (it’s like a thin milkshake) or use it as the base for your shakes. Add strawberries and a little bit of honey. You will have a tasty protein shake that is full probiotics and vitamin C.

Freeze some fresh blueberries. You can even top them with a little light or fat-free whipped cream. Blueberries are a great source of vitamin C and fiber.

As an alternative to ice cream, how about putting yogurt (or a homemade smoothie) into an ice cube tray and freezing it. The cubes will get “slushy”.

If you like it SALTY

Grab a hard pretzel, twist or stick. These are a better choice then potato chips. Have a few with some peanut butter or some dark chocolate.

Experiment with different crackers. Look for a brand called “Mary’s Gone Crackers”. Their stuff is amazing, and is whole grain, no gluten, no trans fats. Very different flavor and EXTREMELY crunchy. Wasa is another brand to try. Hummus, Laughing Cow, or lowfat cream cheese are great spreads to put on these.

Make a quick quesadilla. Use a corn or flour tortilla (corn is lower in fat) and sprinkle with a shredded cheese blend, like Mexican or cheddar jack. Microwave for about 12 seconds. Roll up and eat. Dip in salsa if you like! These are great for breakfast, too, especially if you add a scrambled egg.

Popcorn!! I think pan popped is the best, but use as little oil as possible. The microwave versions are so dang tricky with their labels it’s exhausting to find one that is actually low fat AND has good taste. Regardless, be creative with what you sprinkle on the popcorn. It doesn’t have to be salt. Try pepper or chili powder. How about cinnamon?

If you like it SWEET

Get some Greek Yogurt, I like Façe. But Dannon, Stonyfield, or Brown Cow are great, also.  Use plain or vanilla and add your own fruit, maybe even a little honey. These tend to be good sources of protein and are good for the evening snack.

There is nothing wrong with DARK chocolate. A little bit goes a long way. Get some that is 70% or higher in cacao. Dark chocolate is high in antioxidants and lower in sugar than regular chocolate. Also great with a few roasted almonds.

Have you tried figs? Get them fresh or dried. They are sticky and sweet and high in fiber. They go great with cheese, honey, yogurt, and chocolate. Pick your combo!

Do you have some great snack ideas to share? Please post them here or on the Rudog fanpage.

Vegetable Packets for the Grill

Vegetable Packets for the Grill

Foil VeggiesSaw a really cool idea about how to fix a large quantity of veggies really easily. It involves grilling and a lot of aluminum foil.

First, pick your veggies to grill. This can be ANYTHING. Let’s say you have broccoli, squash, carrots, and green beans. Make a BIG foil packet…..I mean big enough to cover a turkey or chicken. Put the veggies in the foil pack.

Add some butter, like 2 tbsps, or a little canola oil. Season how you like stuff.  Salt and pepper?  Cajun seasoning?  Your choice.

Toss on the grill for about 15 to 20 minutes while you cook some meat or fish. All set!

Food Tip: Expensive OJ is Worth it!

Food Tip: Expensive OJ is Worth it!

Hanging out in grocery stores and cruising the aisles for new foods to try may not be high on your list of things to do. Neither is reading labels in public. (Yes, labels can be read) No worries. Let Rudog do it. Happy to help a dude (or chick) out. Check here  to find out about different foods you should try. Some will be new. Some will only be new to you. Some you will like. Some you won’t. It’s cool either way. Rudog does not receive any support for mentioning a food or food product. No corporate spoon feeding here. It’s all real Rudog opinion.

OJ the Rudog Way

OJ is one of those foods that you SHOULD pay the extra money for, but only for the REALLY REALLY good stuff. I do NOT mean Sunny Delight. I mean brands like Tropicana, Minute Maid, or Simply Orange. Some things you should know:

  1. The good stuff is 100% juice. NOT made from concentrate.
  2. Drinking real juice counts as water and fruit intake.
  3. You can purchase OJ that is fortified with calcium. It’s an easy way to get the same amount of calcium if you don’t like milk.
  4. You can purchase low-acid OJ if regular OJ bothers you. (yes….LOTS of people can’t tolerate the acidity.)

Rudog’s vote for best orange juice goes to Tropicana Pure, 100% Valencia orange juice. It will rock your world. Get it with or without pulp, it doesn’t matter. Not all grocery stores carry this, so you may have to hunt around. Simply Orange, by Minute Maid is the next best choice. It is 100% juice, just not from Valencia oranges. The bonus is that it is much easier to find in the grocery stores.

BTW, if you have a food product you would like Rudog to check out, send an email to [email protected]

Glycemic Index

This comes and goes with regard to popularity, and right now it seems to be back. The Glycemic Index (GI) shows what happens to our blood sugar when we digest different types of carbohydrates. Carbohydrates that break down quickly cause a quicker rise in blood sugar than those that break down more slowly. Foods are ranked according to the effect of 50 grams of carbohydrate from a particular food on blood sugar in comparison to the effect of 50 grams from glucose. The index is a scale of 1-100, with glucose being assigned 100. Originally, the GI was developed as a research tool for use with people with diabetes.

In general, foods that have a lower GI score will have a lower impact on glucose levels. Foods that have a GI of less than 55 are considered “low”. Foods with a GI of 55-70 are considered “moderate”, and foods that are above 70 are considered “high”.

There are many problems with trying to apply the data from the GI to every day eating.

First of all, most eating does not involve eating carbohydrate by itself. Second, the GI is based on 50 GRAMS of carbohydrate of a single food, which may be significantly more than a person would eat of a particular food. Third, there are many variables that can affect the GI of a food: ripeness, the presence of acid in a food, individual differences in people’s digestion, cooking time, just to name a few.

Another key issue with the GI index is that you can’t make an educated guess about which foods are low or high. You have to look it up. Potatoes are not all the same. Orange juice is different from oranges.

With all that being said, there is certainly nothing wrong with looking for ways to increase your intake of foods that are good for you. If the GI is something you feel is valuable and helpful, have at it! There  are plenty of great books and cookbooks out there on the subject. Just remember one thing: Eating should be easy. Don’t get so caught up in a “system” that you forget to enjoy the simple pleasure of eating foods you enjoy.

What is a whole grain food?

There seems to be a lot of confusion as to what exactly is a whole grain. You wouldn’t think it would be that complicated, but the the food makers are experts at confusing the consumer. Labels everywhere talk about how their bread or cereal is a good source of whole grains. They mention that their food comes from a whole grain and then imply that you are eating a whole grain food. But are you? You aren’t.

Products that are made from whole grain FLOUR are NOT the same as eating whole grain. Whole grain foods are generally made from wild rice, millet, quinoa, barley, seeds, or wheat berries. These go into the food (bread, cracker, cereal) in their WHOLE, or original form. You will physically see the grain or seed, and have to chew it to eat it. This is very different from whole grain flour. Flour is where the grain has been ground before it is used. Whole wheat bread, for example, is brown, but does not have the seed or actual grain in it.

I do not want to dismiss eating foods made from whole wheat flour. Whole wheat flour is good, and a good step in the right direction in terms of having a higher fiber and vitamin content than regular white bread. However, if you are looking for a food that has a lower glycemic index than white bread, the whole wheat bread is not going to be that much better. They are both around 70 on the glycemic index.

Whole grain foods are a little trickier to find and tend to cost a little bit more. Many times these products will be found more readily in markets that have organic foods, and they are frequently in the freezer section. They don’t have as long a shelf life, so they have to be kept frozen.

As always, variety is important and so is taste. You have to find the balance that works for you and your wallet. Choosing more whole grain foods is a good goal, but you don’t have to accomplish it overnight. Start slowly and find foods that you enjoy eating. Remember, drinking lots of water is VERY important when you start increasing the fiber content of your diet. 🙂

Fuel to Train

HOW and WHAT you eat plays a vital role in exercise, training, and performance. Everyone has had that moment where that truth is realized on a personal level. You hit the wall lifting weights and you realize that when you eat bad you train bad. You have a day where you feel like you could run forever on that God forsaken treadmill and you realize that when you eat good, you train better. The problem is, you aren’t absolutely sure why one day was bad and one day was better.

Let’s start with carb intake. It DOES NOT MATTER what sport or exercise you are involved in, good eating involves carbs. Yes, carbohydrate. A lot of it. Most athletes should be eating upwards of 60% of their total calories from carbs. I know what you are thinking. The answer is still CARBS. Here is why:

  1. The body is designed to burn carbs for fuel. This is the most efficient energy producing fuel you can eat.
  2. Your muscles store carbs for energy. They do NOT store protein. (I know, catch your breath!)
  3. If there isn’t enough available carbs in the diet, the body will break down protein (muscle) to compensate

Now based on what I just said above, here is what needs to happen. You need to make sure that you have enough carbs in your diet and in the right amount. If you aren’t sure what a carb is, then get with me and let’s fix that.

Some red flags that could be indicators of not enough carbs in your diet:

  1. Poor endurance, cardio is really tough. You “hit the wall” frequently.
  2. Poor recovery. It seems to take a while to recover from a workout.
  3. Lingering injuries. Something is always out of whack or not completely healed.
  4. You consume a high protein diet.

No gas, No go. Eat like a Rudog.

Can you be a vegetarian MMA fighter?

Are you thinking about changing things up this year? Maybe you are ready for a new way of eating . Maybe you have thought about trying to eat clean all the time.  (Do we really know what “eating clean” means? It seems to be a highly variable definition.) Maybe you have even wondered if becoming vegetarian is a good idea or not. There are definitely  more and more fighters evaluating their diet options, and even departing from their “high protein” ways. Fighters are starting to explore eating styles that have previously been considered non-traditional for MMA, like vegetarianism and veganism.  There are several fighters who are known for their vegetarian and vegan eating styles; Jake Shields, Frank Mir, and Mac Danzig, to name a few.   If you are considering adopting a vegetarian way of eating, you will first have to decide exactly HOW vegetarian you are going to eat.

There are so many variations. Some are super strict (like vegan) and some allow milk and eggs, but not beef and chicken. The type of vegetarianism you decide on will determine what foods you will have to focus on to make sure that you get enough protein and certain vitamins, like calcium, B12, and Iron.

If you are just going to be a straight forward vegetarian, at a minimum, you will not be eating ANY meat, fish, or poultry, dairy, or eggs. The good thing is this generally means that the overall diet will be lower in saturated fat and cholesterol, while higher in fiber, B vitamins and antioxidants. On the other hand, if not well planned, the vegetarian diet can be low or inadequate in B12, Iron, calcium, and omega 3 fatty acids. It becomes important to eat a variety of foods so that over a period of time there aren’t any risks of nutrient deficiencies. Aside from having to make sure that the diet is providing all of the vitamins a fighter needs, it is important to make sure that the diet also provides enough total calories for the amount and type of training a fighter will be doing. The typical MMA fighter needs anywhere from 2000-4000 calories a day. This will depend greatly on height, weight, age, and training level.  Unfortunately, many fighters have no idea how many calories they need to be eating, so they end up eating too few calories. Plus, since they are constantly cutting weight, they are always trying to eat even less.  The vegetarian MMA fighter needs to know exactly what his or her caloric intake should be so that the diet can be designed to meet the need.

Let’s pretend we know a 28 yr old fighter named Jim who wants to become a vegetarian. He is 5ft 8inches and fights at 155 lbs. He used to walk around at 175, but since he has been working with Rudog he doesn’t do that anymore. He has adapted his training and diet to maintain his weight at 160. (He is soooo smart!) Now that he wants to be vegetarian, his diet will definitely change. His calorie needs are estimated to be around 2500 calories per day. Here is what a typical day might look like for him:

Breakfast

  • 1             Whole Wheat English Muffin
  • 1 tbsp    Jelly
  • 1 cup     Orange Juice
  • 1 cup     Mixed fresh fruit topped with coconut flakes

Morning Snack

  • ¼ cup    Homemade trail mix
  • 12 oz      Green tea

Lunch

  • 1            Veggie burger w/lettuce, tomato on whole wheat bun
  • 1 oz        Baked Lays
  • 2 cups    Mixed green salad w/ 1 tbs olive oil and balsamic vinegar

Dinner

  • 2 cups   Spicy tofu with brown rice
  • 2 cups   Steamed veggies
  • 1 cup     Fresh fruit

Evening Snack

  • 2 cups    Popcorn
  • 12 oz      Fruit smoothie made with soy milk

This meal plan ends up providing around 2500 calories, with 63% from carbs, 12% protein, and 25% fat.  If you analyze if for vitamin and mineral content, it will not provide the recommended daily amounts of calcium, vitamin C, iron, B12, and others.  This is because when dairy and eggs are eliminated, it becomes difficult to get those nutrients without some serious menu planning and rotation. Variety in food selection becomes extremely important.  This particular meal plan did not include any dry beans or legumes, but doing so would certainly bump the nutrient value in several categories.  The problem is most guys don’t want to eat beans every day, let alone for every meal. Not to mention the “GI distress” that comes with the territory. Oh, you WILL be gassier as a vegetarian, beans or no beans! That just comes with the territory.  It is generally not a bad idea to take a multivitamin if you are eating vegetarian or vegan. You can also see where getting enough protein every day certainly takes some planning. This meal plan provides 12% and a good range is anywhere from 15-25% for fighters.  A protein supplement would be an option to look at, or just make darn sure that there are high-protein foods consumed every day, like nuts, beans, hummus, egg substitutes, soy, and tofu.  Where you have to be careful is the fat content of the diet. The vegetarian protein sources can be high in fat. It’s definitely a balancing act. If you choose to go the vegetarian route that does include dairy and eggs, it becomes MUCH simpler. The protein and calcium intake is less of a concern.

For the vegan, the challenges are a little more difficult because the food choices are much narrower. It can also become tempting to slide into a routine of eating the same thing all the time. This is certainly convenient, but over time can compromise the nutritional quality of the diet. When variety is limited, vitamin and mineral content is, too. The biggest challenges are getting enough absorbable iron and B12.  These are best absorbed by the body when they are eaten from animal products, so getting them strictly from plant based foods is more difficult. The absorption rate of iron is greatly decreased when it is coming from plant based foods. Without the use of a high quality iron supplement the risk of anemia is high. It’s not a bad idea to have regular blood tests to make sure everything is ok.

Vegetarian diets are definitely possible for MMA athletes and fighters, but they do require a little more pre-planning and food preparation. Here are some things to think about if you are considering going vegetarian:

Pros

  • Lower in saturated fat
  • Higher in fiber
  • Lower in sodium
  • Lower in cholesterol
  • Greater intake of fruits and veggies

Cons

  • The diet can become higher in fat if cheese and dairy are used as main sources of protein and    for flavor
  • Higher dairy intake can increase the intake of saturated fat
  • Foods can be more expensive
  • Fresh foods don’t last long and can be spoil before they are eaten.
  • You will need more time for frequent trips to grocery store and for food preparation.

Any time you are considering a significant diet change, it is a good idea to talk with a registered dietitian just to make sure that the diet is appropriate for you and what your fitness goals are.


Food Tip: Brummel and Brown

Looking for an alternative to plain old butter? Check out a product called Brummel and Brown. It’s made from yogurt, canola, and soybean oil. It tastes fantastic and comes in plain, blueberry, or strawberry. You would use it on the same foods you would put butter or cream cheese on. Bagels, toast, english muffins, or whatever else you like! It’s healthier because it doesn’t have the saturated fat that butter or cream cheese has. It also does not have any trans-fats. You can’t cook with it, but it’s a great for table top use. Look for it in the refrigerated section next to the butters and margarines.

Pre-Exercise: What to Eat and Drink

This is absolutely one of the top 10 topics in sport nutrition.  It is so important to have a strategy in place as to how you will fuel and hydrate to prepare for training and exercise. What and when to eat and drink is highly variable and has to be individualized. As an athlete, you have to do a little experimenting to determine what foods and beverages you tolerate, as well as which ones enhance performance. Keeping a journal is a really good idea. It’s important to remember that what works for one athlete may or may not work for another.

Food

Pre-exercise meals should have some carbohydrate, moderate protein, and some fat. The meal needs to be eaten 3-4 hours prior to exercise. Of course, this will be different for early morning workouts. In those instances, the “meal” will be much smaller (like only 100-200 kcals) and consumed 30-45 min prior to workout.  Think in along the lines of part of an energy bar or a small bowl of oatmeal. If you aren’t doing an exhaustive workout, the pre-exercise calories aren’t as critical.

Fluids

At least 2-3 hours before a workout, start hydrating. This can be water, a sport drink, or a fitness water. This will not only keep you hydrated, but allow ample time for emptying from the stomach so that you don’t get cramps. If you are wondering, “Which is better? Water or a sports drink?” Then answer is, “They BOTH hydrate equally well.” Choose the one that works best for YOU. There is a lot of science behind the formulas of the sports drinks, so definitely take some time to educate yourself and to try some of them. They will taste very different when they are consumed during/after exercise, as opposed to just drinking them as a beverage.

The sport drinks, like Powerade and Gatorade, are designed in way that reduces the incidence of cramping, promotes absorption and stimulates the thirst mechanism. They are generally around 6-8% Carbohydrate and use a combination of fructose, sucrose and glucose to promote emptying and speed fluid absorption. Gatorade is 6% and this helps stimulate carbohydrate absorption. Powerade is also 6%. They are both low sodium, with just enough to keep the thirst mechanism going!

Always pay attention to how well hydrated you are. Sweat production can vary depending on intensity, duration, temperature, and humidity. Fluid weight that is lost during exercise is fluid that must be replaced.

The Gatorade website has a tremendous amount of information if you want to check it out.

Goat Cheese and Tomato Omelet

Goat Cheese and Tomato Omelet

omelet3 egg whites

2 eggs

1 Tbsp water

Dash of salt and pepper

Nonstick cooking spray

1/3 cup crumbled goat cheese

1 diced tomato

2 Tbsp chopped fresh basil or parsley

 

Whisk together egg whites, eggs, water, salt and pepper in medium bowl. Spray nonstick spray in skillet and heat over medium heat. Add egg mixture and cook for 2 minutes or until eggs begin to set on the bottom. Gently lift edge of omelet to allow uncooked portion of eggs to flow to underneath. Cook until the center is set. Sprinkle cheese, tomato and basil over half of omelet. Fold omelet over the filling. Let cook until cheese melts. (you might even turn the heat down a little bit). Cut in half and serve. Makes 2 servings.

Calories: 80   Carbs: 2g     Fat: 5g     Pro: 10g

Mexican Salad

Mexican Salad

Corn SaladIncorporating lots of salads into the daily eating plan is a great way to add some bulk, some vitamins, and some color, but it’s easy to get caught up in the same old salad bag routine which just becomes boring. Spice it up a little bit for some variety and interest. This little “recipe” is a super easy way to add some protein, fiber and flavor with VERY LITTLE fat.

 

 

Take a mixed green salad bag and add the following:

  • 1 cup of canned black beans (you can warm these before adding)
  • 1 cup of canned mexican style corn
  • Crunchy tortilla strips…I like blue ones….to sprinkle on top
  • Salsa or pico de gallo
  • Fresh Cilantro
  • Lime juice from a fresh lime

You could always top with grilled chicken breast or fish, but this is great as is. You could also top with sliced jicama for additional crunch, in place of the tortilla strips.

Compare Rudog Omega to SFH Liquid Omega

Supplementing the diet with Omega 3 fatty acids is a good idea. Research absolutely supports this. It is particularly important if you are someone who doesn’t eat fish on a regular basis or at all. Omega 3 fatty acids are known to have a protective effect on the cardiovascular system. They inhibit clot formation and promote vasodilation. This is good if you are trying to NOT have a heart attack or a stroke, and would like to have good blood pressure.

With this in mind, Rudog now has a liquid supplement called Rudog Omega. It is orange flavored and has omega 3 fatty acids plus Vitamin D3. The D3 supports cardiovascular health, but also supports neurologic and bone health.

Anytime you are considering a supplement you should consider the following:

1. Do I really need it?

2. Is it safe?

3. How much does it cost?

4. What are my choices? Who else makes this product?

With that in mind, please evaluate Rudog Omega and other liquid omegas that are out there. Specifically, SFH.

Here is what you will find:

Rudog Omega is :

STEAM distilled and has

Fish Oil (Sardine & Anchovy) 4,365 mg *
Omega 3 1,300 mg
EPA 698 mg
DHA 436 mg
Other 1931mg
Vitamin D3 1000IU

SFH is

MOLECULAR distilled.

Total Omegas =3705 mg

EPA 2204mg

DHA 990mg

Other 512

Vitamin D3 1000IU

Rudog Omega is $.80/teaspoon. SFH is $1.00/teaspoon

Rudog is only going to put out a high quality product. We have built our reputation on only associating with the best. Supplements are no exception.

Email us directly at [email protected] to order or request more information.

Nutrition on a Budget

Nutrition on a Budget

See how to find in regular food the nutrients we typically obtain from supplementation. See some of the most nutrient-dense foods you can have in your kitchen, and know how they can promote your muscle gains.

Keep it up!

I’m talking about metabolism. It’s important to keep it UP.  How you eat directly effects how your metabolism operates. If you want to keep your metabolism UP, that is, burning calories all day long, you have to feed it correctly and do the right kind of exercise.  Yeah, yeah, you’ve heard this before, right? You probably think this doesn’t apply to you because you eat all the time and have no problem putting on muscle. You are also probably between the ages of 18 and 25. 🙂 If that is the case, you are young enough that you haven’t really had to work very hard at this, if at all. Hormones are on your side (for now) and you are kind of on “metabolic auto pilot”. BUT,  things change after 25!! They REALLY change once you hit 30. NOW is the time to put the right habits in place.

For those that have already experienced some of those metabolism challenges that come with age, I have good news: You can do this with diet and exercise and you DON’T need expensive specialty supplements and “fat burners”.

Let’s go over the basics:

1. You have to eat every 2-3 hours and it has to start with breakfast. 

If you have been sleeping in until 10:30 or later, you are missing the jump-start to your day. You would be doing yourself a big favor by waking up at a more traditional time (7:30?) and having a mini breakfast—-like a slice of toast and a little glass of juice.  You could even go back to bed for a little bit, then have a real meal 2-3 hours later. You won’t gain fat weight, but you will stoke your metabolism enough to wake it up. By the time 2 hours goes by, you will be plenty hungry. This is actually the ultimate goal: To eat just enough that you stay satisfied for 2-3 hours, but then are really hungry at the next meal time. This is your body demonstrating that it is utilizing the calories that are coming in efficiently. When the body has burned them all up, it begins to send hunger signals. This is the body’s request for more fuel, please! When you do this all throughout the day, the metabolism never has the opportunity to stall, or slow down. It is constantly working on digesting and absorbing the incoming calories, which means it is BURNING calories. 🙂

2. Maintaining and building muscle mass is essential to increasing metabolism

Up until around the age of 25, the body is primarily anabolic. This means it is in “building mode”. After the age of 25, the body is primarily catabolic. This means it is no longer building stuff, but rather, is tearing things down. We lose muscle mass naturally, about 1% per year. If there is no exercise that maintains existing muscle mass (like lifting weights) or that puts on additional muscle, then the metabolic rate naturally declines. Muscle is metabolically active and burns calories, but as we lose muscle, we require fewer calories. In order to prevent or minimize this, the exercise program must include exercises that promote muscle building. The ideal exercise training program uses a combination of cardio and strength training exercises. The cardio keeps the inside of the body strong and healthy while the strength training improves strength, tone, and increases the metabolic rate. Studies have been able to demonstrate that strength training increases metabolic rate for several hours after an exercise session. Cardio does not.

For those that are over 30, you will have noticed that it is more difficult to cut weight, especially at the last minute. All of those “short cuts” you used to be able to take just don’t cut it anymore. You actually have to put in the long hours of training, get plenty of sleep and eat healthy all of the time. That is all part of aging, but it can be made a little easier by being consistent with your training, your sleep, and your diet. Don’t you wish you had been doing this all those years ago so that now it would be no big deal???? That is the message to the younger guys and girls. Get it right when you are young, so you don’t have to make major changes later.

As for those fat burners and metabolism stimulants, save your money and buy great groceries. Maybe even order some Rudog bars! The pills and powders are gimmicks and generally a waste of your time of money. Be smarter with both. Invest in good workouts and a good diet.

You can schedule your ZOOM Bariatric Nutrition Class by clicking HERE  

Classes are offered at 2:00 and 4:30 every Monday, 2:00 every Wednesday, or 12:00 every Thursday.

We can't wait for you to join us!