Omega 3’s are Important

Omega 3’s are Important

 

rudog omega 3 liquid supplement with vitamin D3

Omega 3 Capsule with Vitamin D3.

There is so much to say about Omega 3’s, I am simply going to devote the next several posts to talking about what they are and why they are important.

Omega 3’s are a type of fatty acid that is unsaturated. For the chemistry buffs out there, this means that they have one or more double bonds. In other words, the double bonds means there is more room for more hydrogen. Thus the term “unsaturated”. They ARE NOT saturated with hydrogen.

The number (as in omega 3) indicates where the first double bond occurs. So with an omega 3, the first double bond is 3 carbons from the end of the fatty acid chain. You have probably heard of other types of fatty acids, like omega 6 or omega 9.

When a fatty acid only has 1 double bond present, it is referred to as a MONO (meaning 1) unsaturated fat. When there are several double bonds, they are referred to as POLY unsaturated fats.

Ok, that’s enough chemistry.

Omega 3 fatty acids have studied for their protective effects on the cardiovascular system. The research goes back to the early 70’s, and the body of research since then has continued to affirm these results. Research has also begun showing positive effects of omega 3’s in brain and retinal development. This is why you will see infant formulas supplemented with DHA and EPA. These are the two types of omega 3 fatty acids associated with these benefits.

Additional research is also looking at the role of omega 3’s in Alzheimer’s Disease, depression disorders, chronic inflammation, inflammatory bowel disease, cancer, lupus, and rheumatoid arthritis. The list goes on, but this gives you an idea of how significant these fatty acids can be.

This is absolutely something you should be supplementing on a regular basis. The Rudog Omega is a concentrated liquid filled CAPSULE with NO aftertaste or burping. Taking it every other day is plenty, unless you just never eat fish. If that’s the case, then simply 1/day is sufficient. Each bottle has 60 capsules, so should last you 2-4 months.

Ladies—do you want healthier hair and skin? This is how you get it.  Order some today! Rudog Omega is only $25.

Mary Cabral, RD/LD

Can you be a vegetarian MMA fighter?

Are you thinking about changing things up this year? Maybe you are ready for a new way of eating . Maybe you have thought about trying to eat clean all the time.  (Do we really know what “eating clean” means? It seems to be a highly variable definition.) Maybe you have even wondered if becoming vegetarian is a good idea or not. There are definitely  more and more fighters evaluating their diet options, and even departing from their “high protein” ways. Fighters are starting to explore eating styles that have previously been considered non-traditional for MMA, like vegetarianism and veganism.  There are several fighters who are known for their vegetarian and vegan eating styles; Jake Shields, Frank Mir, and Mac Danzig, to name a few.   If you are considering adopting a vegetarian way of eating, you will first have to decide exactly HOW vegetarian you are going to eat.

There are so many variations. Some are super strict (like vegan) and some allow milk and eggs, but not beef and chicken. The type of vegetarianism you decide on will determine what foods you will have to focus on to make sure that you get enough protein and certain vitamins, like calcium, B12, and Iron.

If you are just going to be a straight forward vegetarian, at a minimum, you will not be eating ANY meat, fish, or poultry, dairy, or eggs. The good thing is this generally means that the overall diet will be lower in saturated fat and cholesterol, while higher in fiber, B vitamins and antioxidants. On the other hand, if not well planned, the vegetarian diet can be low or inadequate in B12, Iron, calcium, and omega 3 fatty acids. It becomes important to eat a variety of foods so that over a period of time there aren’t any risks of nutrient deficiencies. Aside from having to make sure that the diet is providing all of the vitamins a fighter needs, it is important to make sure that the diet also provides enough total calories for the amount and type of training a fighter will be doing. The typical MMA fighter needs anywhere from 2000-4000 calories a day. This will depend greatly on height, weight, age, and training level.  Unfortunately, many fighters have no idea how many calories they need to be eating, so they end up eating too few calories. Plus, since they are constantly cutting weight, they are always trying to eat even less.  The vegetarian MMA fighter needs to know exactly what his or her caloric intake should be so that the diet can be designed to meet the need.

Let’s pretend we know a 28 yr old fighter named Jim who wants to become a vegetarian. He is 5ft 8inches and fights at 155 lbs. He used to walk around at 175, but since he has been working with Rudog he doesn’t do that anymore. He has adapted his training and diet to maintain his weight at 160. (He is soooo smart!) Now that he wants to be vegetarian, his diet will definitely change. His calorie needs are estimated to be around 2500 calories per day. Here is what a typical day might look like for him:

Breakfast

  • 1             Whole Wheat English Muffin
  • 1 tbsp    Jelly
  • 1 cup     Orange Juice
  • 1 cup     Mixed fresh fruit topped with coconut flakes

Morning Snack

  • ¼ cup    Homemade trail mix
  • 12 oz      Green tea

Lunch

  • 1            Veggie burger w/lettuce, tomato on whole wheat bun
  • 1 oz        Baked Lays
  • 2 cups    Mixed green salad w/ 1 tbs olive oil and balsamic vinegar

Dinner

  • 2 cups   Spicy tofu with brown rice
  • 2 cups   Steamed veggies
  • 1 cup     Fresh fruit

Evening Snack

  • 2 cups    Popcorn
  • 12 oz      Fruit smoothie made with soy milk

This meal plan ends up providing around 2500 calories, with 63% from carbs, 12% protein, and 25% fat.  If you analyze if for vitamin and mineral content, it will not provide the recommended daily amounts of calcium, vitamin C, iron, B12, and others.  This is because when dairy and eggs are eliminated, it becomes difficult to get those nutrients without some serious menu planning and rotation. Variety in food selection becomes extremely important.  This particular meal plan did not include any dry beans or legumes, but doing so would certainly bump the nutrient value in several categories.  The problem is most guys don’t want to eat beans every day, let alone for every meal. Not to mention the “GI distress” that comes with the territory. Oh, you WILL be gassier as a vegetarian, beans or no beans! That just comes with the territory.  It is generally not a bad idea to take a multivitamin if you are eating vegetarian or vegan. You can also see where getting enough protein every day certainly takes some planning. This meal plan provides 12% and a good range is anywhere from 15-25% for fighters.  A protein supplement would be an option to look at, or just make darn sure that there are high-protein foods consumed every day, like nuts, beans, hummus, egg substitutes, soy, and tofu.  Where you have to be careful is the fat content of the diet. The vegetarian protein sources can be high in fat. It’s definitely a balancing act. If you choose to go the vegetarian route that does include dairy and eggs, it becomes MUCH simpler. The protein and calcium intake is less of a concern.

For the vegan, the challenges are a little more difficult because the food choices are much narrower. It can also become tempting to slide into a routine of eating the same thing all the time. This is certainly convenient, but over time can compromise the nutritional quality of the diet. When variety is limited, vitamin and mineral content is, too. The biggest challenges are getting enough absorbable iron and B12.  These are best absorbed by the body when they are eaten from animal products, so getting them strictly from plant based foods is more difficult. The absorption rate of iron is greatly decreased when it is coming from plant based foods. Without the use of a high quality iron supplement the risk of anemia is high. It’s not a bad idea to have regular blood tests to make sure everything is ok.

Vegetarian diets are definitely possible for MMA athletes and fighters, but they do require a little more pre-planning and food preparation. Here are some things to think about if you are considering going vegetarian:

Pros

  • Lower in saturated fat
  • Higher in fiber
  • Lower in sodium
  • Lower in cholesterol
  • Greater intake of fruits and veggies

Cons

  • The diet can become higher in fat if cheese and dairy are used as main sources of protein and    for flavor
  • Higher dairy intake can increase the intake of saturated fat
  • Foods can be more expensive
  • Fresh foods don’t last long and can be spoil before they are eaten.
  • You will need more time for frequent trips to grocery store and for food preparation.

Any time you are considering a significant diet change, it is a good idea to talk with a registered dietitian just to make sure that the diet is appropriate for you and what your fitness goals are.


Compare Rudog Omega to SFH Liquid Omega

Supplementing the diet with Omega 3 fatty acids is a good idea. Research absolutely supports this. It is particularly important if you are someone who doesn’t eat fish on a regular basis or at all. Omega 3 fatty acids are known to have a protective effect on the cardiovascular system. They inhibit clot formation and promote vasodilation. This is good if you are trying to NOT have a heart attack or a stroke, and would like to have good blood pressure.

With this in mind, Rudog now has a liquid supplement called Rudog Omega. It is orange flavored and has omega 3 fatty acids plus Vitamin D3. The D3 supports cardiovascular health, but also supports neurologic and bone health.

Anytime you are considering a supplement you should consider the following:

1. Do I really need it?

2. Is it safe?

3. How much does it cost?

4. What are my choices? Who else makes this product?

With that in mind, please evaluate Rudog Omega and other liquid omegas that are out there. Specifically, SFH.

Here is what you will find:

Rudog Omega is :

STEAM distilled and has

Fish Oil (Sardine & Anchovy) 4,365 mg *
Omega 3 1,300 mg
EPA 698 mg
DHA 436 mg
Other 1931mg
Vitamin D3 1000IU

SFH is

MOLECULAR distilled.

Total Omegas =3705 mg

EPA 2204mg

DHA 990mg

Other 512

Vitamin D3 1000IU

Rudog Omega is $.80/teaspoon. SFH is $1.00/teaspoon

Rudog is only going to put out a high quality product. We have built our reputation on only associating with the best. Supplements are no exception.

Email us directly at [email protected] to order or request more information.

You can schedule your ZOOM Bariatric Nutrition Class by clicking HERE  

Classes are offered at 2:00 every Monday, 1:00 every Wednesday, 12:00 every Thursday, and 10:00 a.m. every Saturday.
Looking for some post-surgery support? Check out our 4:30 support group on Mondays.

We can't wait for you to join us!