Creamy Alaska Salmon Pasta

Creamy Alaska Salmon Pasta

This recipe is from the Alaska Seafood Marketing Institute, check out more of their stuff by clicking here.

salmon Pasta

Ingredients:

I pkg      Macaroni or small shell pasta

½ cup    Creamy Garlic Herb or Lemon Dill Mix

1 Tbsp   butter

1              shallot, finely chopped (you can use a regular onion instead)

1 cup     Your favorite vegetable, like peas or mushrooms

1 tsp      lemon juice, preferably fresh

1 can      skinless, boneless salmon

 

Directions:

Cook pasta according to the package instructions and drain.

In a small sauce pan, gently heat the sauce of your choice and set aside.

In a large pan, melt butter and sauté shallot and vegetables until tender. Stir in the warmed sauce. Stir well.

Add the lemon juice, pasta, and salmon to the sauce mixture.  Toss well and serve.

 

 

Chicken with Turmeric and Cumin

Chicken with Turmeric and Cumin

Spiced ChickenThis is a Rudog original recipe. This is a GREAT way to get some turmeric and cumin (superfoods!) into your diet!

I actually use frozen thighs, so my cooking time takes around 20 minutes. Obviously fresh or thawed chicken will cook more quickly. You can use breasts, but they aren’t as tender. No recipe is ever set in stone, so feel free to adapt it how you like it!

Check out this link to learn more benefits about turmeric!

 

  • 6 chicken thighs (boneless and skinless)
  • 1 can diced tomatoes
  • 1-2 cups chicken broth, could be more…..
  • 1 can green peas
  • 1-2 tsp cumin
  • 1-2 tsp turmeric

In a large skillet, pour the chicken broth over the chicken thighs. It doesn’t have to completely cover them,  but it should be deep enough to  bathe them. Add the tomatoes, undrained, and as much of the canned peas as you like. You can actually save half the can to add to some rice later….your choice. Season with a little salt if you want, and then cumin and turmeric. Start with a tsp of each, and then add more if you decide you like it stronger.

Let simmer on low to medium  heat until the chicken is completely cooked. Probably around 15 minutes. I like to cover this in the beginning, and then uncover it for the last few minutes of cooking to thicken up a little bit. The chicken will be tender and easy to cut when it is ready.

This is fantastic when it is served with basmati rice. Cook the rice in chicken broth instead of water for a little more flavor. Toss in some of those peas at the end (if you saved any) and serve!

This is a well balanced meal that has carbs, protein, and a little fat. Perfect.

Probiotics

Probiotics

Hyperbiotics Pro-15

Hyperbiotics Pro-15

 

It’s always a good idea to re-evaluate your supplement regimen, or to simply evaluate if there is something you should or need to be taking. Research changes constantly, so it’s a good idea to try to keep up. I’m not an advocate of supplementing lots of stuff, and I rarely “recommend” anything. However, I am a fan of looking into probiotics as a mainstay of the diet. If you are someone who doesn’t eat lots of yogurt or milk based foods, you should consider a probiotic supplement.

Ideally, you should increase these types of foods in your diet, but a supplement is a good second choice. There are different forms of supplementation, but I really like the probiotics from a company called Hyperbiotics. Specifically, Pro15.

Why take probiotics? They not only improve gut health, they also boost the immune system. For individuals whose diets vary drastically, or who are engaged in extremely physical/stressful activity, or who don’t eat a nutritionally balanced diet, probiotics are a great way to add a little “insurance” and help the body keep itself in good health. Check out the different options here.

This is not expensive and it’s not complicated. Give it a try for at least a week and see if you don’t notice a difference in the way you feel.

Breakfast Burrito

Breakfast Burrito

Egg Burrito

Need a fast, high energy, nutritious breakfast? Think Breakfast Burrito. No, not fast food. You make this one yourself. SUPER SIMPLE.

  1. 3 Eggs
  2. 2 Flour tortillas
  3. 2 oz shredded cheese (Mexican blend works best)
  4. Salsa, taco sauce, or picante sauce

Scramble the eggs, put in warmed tortillas, top with cheese and salsa. You can wrap these in plastic wrap to eat later if you want.

Suggestion: Make a lot of these ahead of time, wrap them in plastic and keep in the fridge. When you are ready to eat one, you can just pop it in the microwave for 30 seconds or so.

This is the kind of thing that is so simple, but so smart. You’re getting protein, a little fat, and some carbs.  A great kick-start to the day or an afternoon snack.

Egg burrito photo by Flickr user jeffreyw
Rice: Get beyond white!

Rice: Get beyond white!

Types of rice

If you are one of those people that thinks rice is either white or brown, and both are boring, you are mistaken. There are so many different kinds of rice, each with a unique flavor and many with a unique use. You would serve yourself well to venture out and try some of the different varieties. Several are mentioned here with brief descriptions and suggestions for use.

  1. Basmati

An aromatic, long-grain rice from India, Bangladesh, and Pakistan. It comes in brown or white. It has a distinct flavor, “nutty” might be a word to describe it. It is a tender, fluffy rice and does not stick. It is used in curries and stir fry, but can also just be served as a side dish.

  1. Brown

This is available in short, medium, or long varieties. It is higher in magnesium, selenium and fiber than white rice. Can be eaten as a breakfast cereal, used in sushi and puddings, and can be substituted for white rice most of the time.

  1. Arborio

This is a medium or short grain rice with a high starch content. It is used to make risotto. (Risotto is an Italian rice dish that is stirred and cooked slowly in a broth to a creamy consistency) Arborio is also used for pudding and other desserts.

  1. Black

Sometimes also called “purple” or “forbidden” rice. It is dark due to the anthocyanin content. It is a whole grain rice and comes in long and short grain varieties. The short grain type is often used to make sticky rice, porridge, and rice pudding.

  1. White

This comes in short, medium and long grain varieties. Most white rice in the U.S. in enriched with thiamin, niacin, folic acid, and iron. Don’t rinse white rice before or after boiling to prevent washing the nutrients away.

  1. Jasmine

This is originally from Thailand and has a very distinctive floral aroma and nutty flavor. It pairs well with Mediterranean food. It is light and fluffy, and can be white or brown. Steaming works better than boiling with this grain.

  1. Wild

Wild rice is actually not rice at all. It is a semi-aquatic grass species grown in North America. It is dark, long and slender with a nutty flavor. The texture is chewy and it is higher in protein than white or brown rice. This is usually mixed with other rices or bulgur wheat. It goes very well with red meats, stews, soups, pilafs, and fruit.

  1. Red

This is a whole grain rice, very rich in antioxidants and other nutrients.  It is a long grain rice from Thailand or a medium grain from Bhutan. It is nutty, chewy and great to add to pilafs, rice salads, and stuffings. Plus it’s beautiful!

All rice varieties have carbohydrate, a little protein, a tiny bit of fat, and all are gluten free. Whole grain rice will have more protein, vitamins, and fiber than white rice. Colored rices will have more antioxidants.

The shape and length of the rice determines its texture when it has been cooked, as well as what dishes to use it in. Long grain rice generally cooks light and fluffy. It is good for adding to rice salads, jambalayas, curries, and stuffings. Medium grain rice is moist and tender. It is better suited for things like paella and risotto. Short grain rice is much moister and stickier, making it a great option for rice puddings and eating with chopsticks.

Rice is a great way to make soups and casseroles even heartier, as well as stretch the food budget.

Get out there and try some rice that isn’t white!

Mary Cabral, Fight Dietitian

Grilled chicken with corn and black bean salsa

Grilled chicken with corn and black bean salsa

Chicken with corn and black bean salsa

Chicken with corn and black bean salsa

 

 

 

 

 

 

1/2 cup corn

1/2 can black beans, rinsed and drained

1/2 cup chopped red bell pepper

1/2 ripe medium avocado, diced

1 jalapeno pepper, optional

1/4 cup chopped cilantro

2 Tbsp lime juice

1/2 tsp salt

1 tsp black pepper

1/2 tsp chili powder

4 boneless chicken breasts (4 ounces each), pounded to 1/2 inch thickness.

Nonstick cooking spray

Combine corn, beans, bell pepper, avocado, jalapenos, cilantro, lime juice and 1/4 tsp salt in a medium bowl. Combine the black pepper, chili powder and remaining salt in small bowl. Sprinkle over chicken. Coat grill pan with spray and heat over medium heat. Cook chicken 4 minutes per side or until no longer pink in the center. Serve each breast with 1/4 cup of the salsa.

Calories: 230    Carbs: 16g    Fat: 7g     Pro: 28g

Honey Lemon Grilled Chicken

Honey Lemon Grilled Chicken

Chicken with lemonsIn the spirit of full disclosure, this is not an original Rudog recipe at all. I found this in People Magazine. Sorry!

Ingredients:

Juice and zest of 3 lemons

1/3 cup                 olive oil

1 tsp                      oregano

1 Tbsp                   Dijon mustard

2 Tbsp                   honey

½ cup                    chopped onion

1 clove                  peeled garlic clove (or jarred garlic)

½ tsp                     salt

½ tsp                     pepper

4                              boneless, skinless chicken breasts

Grilled lemon wedges

Instructions:

1. In a small bowl, mix together the lemon juice, zest, olive oil, oregano, mustard, honey, onion, garlic, salt and pepper. Set aside ¼ cup for basting. Place chicken in the bowl, cover and marinate for at least 30 minutes in the fridge.

2. Preheat grill to medium-high. Lightly oil grill grate. Place chicken on the grill over indirect heat. Cook 6-8 minutes each side, until juices run clear. Baste occasionally with the ¼ cup reserve marinade.

3. Serve, drizzle with a little honey and garnish with the lemon wedges.

Fuel to Train

HOW and WHAT you eat plays a vital role in exercise, training, and performance. Everyone has had that moment where that truth is realized on a personal level. You hit the wall lifting weights and you realize that when you eat bad you train bad. You have a day where you feel like you could run forever on that God forsaken treadmill and you realize that when you eat good, you train better. The problem is, you aren’t absolutely sure why one day was bad and one day was better.

Let’s start with carb intake. It DOES NOT MATTER what sport or exercise you are involved in, good eating involves carbs. Yes, carbohydrate. A lot of it. Most athletes should be eating upwards of 60% of their total calories from carbs. I know what you are thinking. The answer is still CARBS. Here is why:

  1. The body is designed to burn carbs for fuel. This is the most efficient energy producing fuel you can eat.
  2. Your muscles store carbs for energy. They do NOT store protein. (I know, catch your breath!)
  3. If there isn’t enough available carbs in the diet, the body will break down protein (muscle) to compensate

Now based on what I just said above, here is what needs to happen. You need to make sure that you have enough carbs in your diet and in the right amount. If you aren’t sure what a carb is, then get with me and let’s fix that.

Some red flags that could be indicators of not enough carbs in your diet:

  1. Poor endurance, cardio is really tough. You “hit the wall” frequently.
  2. Poor recovery. It seems to take a while to recover from a workout.
  3. Lingering injuries. Something is always out of whack or not completely healed.
  4. You consume a high protein diet.

No gas, No go. Eat like a Rudog.

Tilapia Salad

Tilapia Salad

  1. 2 pieces of Costco tortilla crusted tilapia
  2. 2 cups mixed salad greens
  3. ½ avocado, sliced
  4. 1 Heirloom tomato (any variety will do)
  5. Balsamic vinegar
  6. Olive Oil

Cook the fish according to package instructions. Slice tomato and avocado and put on top of salad. Top with cooked fish. Dress with balsamic vinegar and olive oil to taste. This is also good with just plain old ranch dressing if you aren’t into balsamic.

Enjoy!

What Can Walnuts do for You?

What Can Walnuts do for You?

If you are looking for an easy way to boost the vitamin content of your diet, give nuts a try. They have long since been recognized for their nutritional value as a source of  polyunsaturated fats, good protein, and antioxidants.  There are so many fantastic nuts to eat, you shouldn’t limit yourself to just one type. Pistachios, almonds, walnuts, cashews, pecans, and macadamias are just a few! For this article, we will focus on walnuts.

A serving of walnuts is going to be 1 oz, or roughly a handful. (I’m talking about walnuts without the shells) This would be about 1/4 cup shelled halves or pieces OR 12-14 halves. A serving has about 18g of fat and 190 calories. Don’t panic. I admit, they are high in fat and calories. This is exactly why you have to be careful when eating nuts, any kind of nuts. However, for people who train HARD and need concentrated calories (especially the kind that can travel in the car and gym bag), nuts are a very strategic, health RICH food.

Walnuts are the only nut to be a significant source of alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), the plant-based source of omega-3 fatty acids. Typically these fatty acids are derived from fish. Omega-3’s are essential fatty acids (that means they have to come from the diet) and known to reduce inflammation.  Research has suggested that omega-3’s may also help reduce the risk of some chronic diseases. You definitely want a diet rich in omega 3’s. Because walnuts are a plant food, and not animal based, there is NO CHOLESTEROL. There isn’t cholesterol in any nut. They are also naturally low in sodium.

I mentioned earlier that nuts are also a good source of antioxidants. Research has suggested that antioxidants may help protect against some cancers, especially those related to the aging process.  As reported in the Spring 2011 volume of SCAN’s Pulse

A 2010 study2 investigating the antioxidant activity of different dry fruits found walnuts to exhibit the best antioxidant properties  Additional research3 testing 1113 different foods for antioxidant levels reported walnuts rank second only to blackberries in terms of antioxidant content  Ellagic acid and gamma tocopherol, a form of vitamin E, are two antioxidants that are thought to have anticarcinogenic properties; both are found in walnuts  Melatonin, an antioxidant known for its sleep regulating properties is also naturally found in walnuts  Research, led by melatonin expert Russel Reiter, PhD4, published in the September 2005 issue of Nutrition: The International Journal of Applied and Basic Nutritional Sciences, reported the calculated concentrations of melatonin in walnuts was 3 5 +/- 1 0ng/g.

I have always been a proponent of using melatonin to help with sleep, but I was not aware that it was an antioxidant! It’s like a bonus!

For those who may prefer to focus on a more vegetarian type of diet, nuts can be a great way to incorporate protein, while adding additional fiber. Fiber helps you feel full and is also beneficial to controlling blood sugar levels. (and they are gluten-free!)

If you happen to like reading research and getting more of the clinical details, you can read more here. Be sure to look for new recipes on the site that use walnuts. 🙂

Can you be a vegetarian MMA fighter?

Are you thinking about changing things up this year? Maybe you are ready for a new way of eating . Maybe you have thought about trying to eat clean all the time.  (Do we really know what “eating clean” means? It seems to be a highly variable definition.) Maybe you have even wondered if becoming vegetarian is a good idea or not. There are definitely  more and more fighters evaluating their diet options, and even departing from their “high protein” ways. Fighters are starting to explore eating styles that have previously been considered non-traditional for MMA, like vegetarianism and veganism.  There are several fighters who are known for their vegetarian and vegan eating styles; Jake Shields, Frank Mir, and Mac Danzig, to name a few.   If you are considering adopting a vegetarian way of eating, you will first have to decide exactly HOW vegetarian you are going to eat.

There are so many variations. Some are super strict (like vegan) and some allow milk and eggs, but not beef and chicken. The type of vegetarianism you decide on will determine what foods you will have to focus on to make sure that you get enough protein and certain vitamins, like calcium, B12, and Iron.

If you are just going to be a straight forward vegetarian, at a minimum, you will not be eating ANY meat, fish, or poultry, dairy, or eggs. The good thing is this generally means that the overall diet will be lower in saturated fat and cholesterol, while higher in fiber, B vitamins and antioxidants. On the other hand, if not well planned, the vegetarian diet can be low or inadequate in B12, Iron, calcium, and omega 3 fatty acids. It becomes important to eat a variety of foods so that over a period of time there aren’t any risks of nutrient deficiencies. Aside from having to make sure that the diet is providing all of the vitamins a fighter needs, it is important to make sure that the diet also provides enough total calories for the amount and type of training a fighter will be doing. The typical MMA fighter needs anywhere from 2000-4000 calories a day. This will depend greatly on height, weight, age, and training level.  Unfortunately, many fighters have no idea how many calories they need to be eating, so they end up eating too few calories. Plus, since they are constantly cutting weight, they are always trying to eat even less.  The vegetarian MMA fighter needs to know exactly what his or her caloric intake should be so that the diet can be designed to meet the need.

Let’s pretend we know a 28 yr old fighter named Jim who wants to become a vegetarian. He is 5ft 8inches and fights at 155 lbs. He used to walk around at 175, but since he has been working with Rudog he doesn’t do that anymore. He has adapted his training and diet to maintain his weight at 160. (He is soooo smart!) Now that he wants to be vegetarian, his diet will definitely change. His calorie needs are estimated to be around 2500 calories per day. Here is what a typical day might look like for him:

Breakfast

  • 1             Whole Wheat English Muffin
  • 1 tbsp    Jelly
  • 1 cup     Orange Juice
  • 1 cup     Mixed fresh fruit topped with coconut flakes

Morning Snack

  • ¼ cup    Homemade trail mix
  • 12 oz      Green tea

Lunch

  • 1            Veggie burger w/lettuce, tomato on whole wheat bun
  • 1 oz        Baked Lays
  • 2 cups    Mixed green salad w/ 1 tbs olive oil and balsamic vinegar

Dinner

  • 2 cups   Spicy tofu with brown rice
  • 2 cups   Steamed veggies
  • 1 cup     Fresh fruit

Evening Snack

  • 2 cups    Popcorn
  • 12 oz      Fruit smoothie made with soy milk

This meal plan ends up providing around 2500 calories, with 63% from carbs, 12% protein, and 25% fat.  If you analyze if for vitamin and mineral content, it will not provide the recommended daily amounts of calcium, vitamin C, iron, B12, and others.  This is because when dairy and eggs are eliminated, it becomes difficult to get those nutrients without some serious menu planning and rotation. Variety in food selection becomes extremely important.  This particular meal plan did not include any dry beans or legumes, but doing so would certainly bump the nutrient value in several categories.  The problem is most guys don’t want to eat beans every day, let alone for every meal. Not to mention the “GI distress” that comes with the territory. Oh, you WILL be gassier as a vegetarian, beans or no beans! That just comes with the territory.  It is generally not a bad idea to take a multivitamin if you are eating vegetarian or vegan. You can also see where getting enough protein every day certainly takes some planning. This meal plan provides 12% and a good range is anywhere from 15-25% for fighters.  A protein supplement would be an option to look at, or just make darn sure that there are high-protein foods consumed every day, like nuts, beans, hummus, egg substitutes, soy, and tofu.  Where you have to be careful is the fat content of the diet. The vegetarian protein sources can be high in fat. It’s definitely a balancing act. If you choose to go the vegetarian route that does include dairy and eggs, it becomes MUCH simpler. The protein and calcium intake is less of a concern.

For the vegan, the challenges are a little more difficult because the food choices are much narrower. It can also become tempting to slide into a routine of eating the same thing all the time. This is certainly convenient, but over time can compromise the nutritional quality of the diet. When variety is limited, vitamin and mineral content is, too. The biggest challenges are getting enough absorbable iron and B12.  These are best absorbed by the body when they are eaten from animal products, so getting them strictly from plant based foods is more difficult. The absorption rate of iron is greatly decreased when it is coming from plant based foods. Without the use of a high quality iron supplement the risk of anemia is high. It’s not a bad idea to have regular blood tests to make sure everything is ok.

Vegetarian diets are definitely possible for MMA athletes and fighters, but they do require a little more pre-planning and food preparation. Here are some things to think about if you are considering going vegetarian:

Pros

  • Lower in saturated fat
  • Higher in fiber
  • Lower in sodium
  • Lower in cholesterol
  • Greater intake of fruits and veggies

Cons

  • The diet can become higher in fat if cheese and dairy are used as main sources of protein and    for flavor
  • Higher dairy intake can increase the intake of saturated fat
  • Foods can be more expensive
  • Fresh foods don’t last long and can be spoil before they are eaten.
  • You will need more time for frequent trips to grocery store and for food preparation.

Any time you are considering a significant diet change, it is a good idea to talk with a registered dietitian just to make sure that the diet is appropriate for you and what your fitness goals are.


Testing the Tank

If you watched the BJ Penn vs. Kenny Florian bout from a couple years back, you heard the phrase “testing the gas tank” mentioned more than once by the commentator. The question being raised was about Penn’s conditioning. He had undertaken a new cardiovascular conditioning program prior to that fight and he didn’t look as energetic in the second round as he usually does. The commentator’s point was that Penn’s gas tank was being tested…..he looked a little sluggish…..did the new training leave him with enough gas in his tank? Had he overtrained? Penn went on to win that fight, but I thought the commentator raised a great question. It’s a question that all fighters should ask themselves constantly: Is my conditioning program putting gas in my tank or am I overtraining and actually running on empty when it’s fight time?

Doing your cardio (whatever that may be) harder and faster for longer does not necessarily produce BETTER conditioning. The conditioning training is not just about training muscles to do work at a certain intensity or duration, but also training muscles to store FUEL at an optimum rate. This involves:

  • Eating enough carbs, protein, and fat DAILY to fuel all  components of your training
  • Proper timing of your eating: Before, During, and After exercise
  • Proper hydration

Total daily intake MUST be adequate if you are going to preserve muscle and stay lean. If you aren’t eating enough carbs, then you are potentially making up the shortage by breaking down some muscle to use as fuel. You will also be limiting the body’s ability to burn fat, making it more difficult to get and stay lean.

Let me say it again. You HAVE to eat carbs, protein, and fat for everything to work correctly. If you are short changing yourself on the carbs so you can eat more protein, then you are short changing your muscles’ ability to store fuel. There are no short cuts here. Eating lots of protein DOES NOT get stored in the muscle as fuel. It also doesn’t magically create big, beautiful biceps. Carbs are stored as fuel in muscle. Carbs fuel exercise that builds big, beautiful muscles.  Protein repairs and synthesizes new muscle. Careful here. Listen to what I said. Muscle is made of protein and needs protein to repair, not enlarge, it.  If you are eating more protein than you need, it is important you understand that the extra protein is a source of extra calories. Extra calories only have a couple of fates. They can be broken down and excreted to some degree or they can be stored as fat. Some of the extra protein is broken down into amino acids and then excreted through the urine. (bummer!) The rest of it is actually stored as fat—–a bigger bummer. A lot of times this is the very reason why a guy can be working out like a dog, taking the protein supplements, and can’t seem to get really lean.

Some of you are thinking, “Yeah, but don’t you know that carbs cause water gain? You actually look leaner when you don’t eat them.”

My reply? Yep, carbs attract water. We all know that’s why you don’t eat them before weigh in. That’s a short term strategy for a short term goal.  So what? Training is LONG TERM. It’s a terrible long term strategy. Guys that hold to that theory are the ones that don’t go 3 rounds. They definitely don’t go 5 rounds. Their only prayer is to submit in round 1. Longer than that is a crap shoot. So, the take home message? You gotta have carbs.

Let all of that digest, and next week I will talk about timing of food.

Goat Cheese and Tomato Omelet

Goat Cheese and Tomato Omelet

omelet3 egg whites

2 eggs

1 Tbsp water

Dash of salt and pepper

Nonstick cooking spray

1/3 cup crumbled goat cheese

1 diced tomato

2 Tbsp chopped fresh basil or parsley

 

Whisk together egg whites, eggs, water, salt and pepper in medium bowl. Spray nonstick spray in skillet and heat over medium heat. Add egg mixture and cook for 2 minutes or until eggs begin to set on the bottom. Gently lift edge of omelet to allow uncooked portion of eggs to flow to underneath. Cook until the center is set. Sprinkle cheese, tomato and basil over half of omelet. Fold omelet over the filling. Let cook until cheese melts. (you might even turn the heat down a little bit). Cut in half and serve. Makes 2 servings.

Calories: 80   Carbs: 2g     Fat: 5g     Pro: 10g

Super Whey Protein Shots

I want to make sure that everyone knows about this product.  I am always looking for a good, versatile protein supplement and this one I like a lot. I use it in the clinical setting with patients and I use it with my athletes.

Super Whey Protein Shots

I like it for a variety of reasons:
  • It travels well and can be kept in your car or gym bag.
  • No mixing.
  • It’s in a container with a screw top.
  • You can order it online and get it pretty reasonably.
  • It’s whey protein
  • It’s only 3-4 oz and it provides 26-35g protein, depending on which one you buy.
  • Has BCAAs

I don’t sell this product and I am not affiliated with anyone who does,  I am just offering my objective opinion. I would certainly love feedback from anyone who is or has used this product. You can post here on the Rudog site or go to the fanpage and do it there! www.facebook.com/rudognutrition/

Mary Bell RD/LD

It’s all about Breakfast!

It’s all about Breakfast!

Healthy BreakfastNutrient timing is perhaps the most overlooked component of an effective training and eating regimen.  The training is scheduled, measured, completed, logged, and adjusted as bio-feedback indicates. There is no question that the training regimen will be repeated every day. What about the eating? All too often it is an afterthought, with most guys playing “catch up” after that last evening workout. By that time, they are STARVING, not to mention exhausted, and in a hurry to get home.  Sounds like the perfect set up for drive-through. 🙁

Here is how it needs to change:

You start with breakfast. If you are in the habit of sleeping through or skipping breakfast, you are completely sabotaging your training efforts.  This is the very reason you have a hard time with the first day’s workout, this is why you are tired around 3:00, and this is why you are starving by the end of your workout later that night. It could also very well be the reason you are sore a lot.

If any of this sounds familiar, EAT BREAKFAST!!  Something is better than nothing, but it’s not hard to have a great breakfast. Make sure you are eating something with carbohydrate, a little protein, and a little fat. The calories should be anywhere from 250 to 500, depending on where you are in your training program. (Bulking up, cutting weight, rest day vs. heavy training, etc.)

Some good examples would be:

  1. Toasted English Muffin (or bagel or toast) with fried egg and slice of American cheese, glass of juice, 4 oz yogurt.
  2. Cereal, toast, juice
  3. 2 egg omelet with spinach, 4 oz yogurt, 1 slice whole wheat toast with a tsp of butter.

You could even start the day with a power bar and have the rest of your calories a little later.  Once you start including breakfast you will notice changes immediately. You may notice your energy level will go up, you will be hungrier throughout the day (this is normal and good), you will rest and recover better, you may lose weight more easily. There could be more!

The importance of the diet in relation to the training cannot be overstated. It is extremely important. If you  want to know if your diet can be better, get with Rudog and find out. Don’t go into your next fight with any doubt.

Make your diet work as hard for you as you do for yourself. Eat to train!

Rudog Vitamins are HERE!

I am very excited to announce that Rudog now has 3 brand new supplements available. I am not a personal fan of taking a lot of different pills, but I do believe there are supplements out there that are well worth taking…….I just want it in as few pills as possible and to not cost a fortune. Rudog Right and the Rudog Omega are my answer to just that.

1. Rudog Right   $31   60 capsules (1 time a day)

This vitamin is Right for everyone, men and women. It addresses the daily supplement concerns you have without providing more than you need. It also focuses on cardiovascular, thyroid, metabolism, joint, bone and brain health. All in one capsule. One time a day. It provides CoQ10, Selenium, Chromium Picolinate, Vitamin D3 and more. It is also gluten and citrus free.

 

2. Rudog Omega    $32  40 servings (1 time a day)

A liquid, orange flavored supplement that provides Omega 3 fatty acids and Vitamin D3. Specifically directed at supporting joint, cardiovascular, brain, and immune health.

 

3. Rudog Whey     $50   30 servings (1 scoop a day)

High quality whey protein, easy to mix and not crazy expensive. From pasture fed cows in New Zealand.  This one is unflavored so that it can be used in anything.

The company making these products has been in business for nearly 40 years and is based here in the United States. They guarantee purity and potency, integrity of formulation, and adherence to label claims.  Rudog wouldn’t do business with anyone doing anything less.

 

 

 

Salmon Black Bean Patties

Salmon Black Bean Patties

Burger1 can pink salmon, drained

1/2 black beans, rinsed and drained

1/4 cup dry bread crumbs

1/4 cup sliced green onions

1 egg white

1 Tbsp chopped cilantro

1 Tbsp lime juice

Pinch red pepper or seafood seasoning mix

Salt and pepper to taste

 

Place salmon in medium bowl and shred with fork. Add beans, bread crumbs, green onions, egg white, cilantro, lime juice, and red pepper to bowl. Season with salt and pepper. Gently stir to combine. Shape mixture into 3 patties about 1 1/4 inch thick. Refrigerate for 30 minutes or until ready to cook. Heat oil in large skillet over medium heat. Cook patties 2-3 minutes per side or until firm and brown.

Calories: 205, Carbs: 13g, Fat: 10g, Pro: 15g

Mexican Salad

Mexican Salad

Corn SaladIncorporating lots of salads into the daily eating plan is a great way to add some bulk, some vitamins, and some color, but it’s easy to get caught up in the same old salad bag routine which just becomes boring. Spice it up a little bit for some variety and interest. This little “recipe” is a super easy way to add some protein, fiber and flavor with VERY LITTLE fat.

 

 

Take a mixed green salad bag and add the following:

  • 1 cup of canned black beans (you can warm these before adding)
  • 1 cup of canned mexican style corn
  • Crunchy tortilla strips…I like blue ones….to sprinkle on top
  • Salsa or pico de gallo
  • Fresh Cilantro
  • Lime juice from a fresh lime

You could always top with grilled chicken breast or fish, but this is great as is. You could also top with sliced jicama for additional crunch, in place of the tortilla strips.

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