Why Rudog is the Right Choice

Why Rudog is the Right Choice

Most of our clients already have a very good understanding of the basics, they just need some help figuring out how to put them into practice or stay focused.

You may be looking for some help understanding and managing:

  • Diabetes or your A1C
  • Hypertension
  • Cholesterol management
  • Inflammatory Bowel or flare ups
  • Anxiety

Maybe you are thinking about bariatric surgery, or are faced with having to do a revision. These are big decisions, and should not be taken lightly. Discipline with your diet is essential to your success. We already work with some of the most respected surgeons in the field of bariatric surgery. We know exactly what you are going through and we have dietitians that specialize in this area. Let us help you experience successful weight loss, healthfully.

Rudog can help you! We take the time to listen to you, answer your questions, and help you understand what to expect. We also take insurance, and many of the conditions listed above are covered by insurance.

If you are looking for supplement recommendations, Rudog is the place to be. We will answer your questions candidly and honestly. We can help you find the right kind of supplements for whatever your unique health or fitness situation is.  We are also your resource for information on CBD supplementation. You probably are curious and we are the perfect place to ask those questions!

For those who are athletes, your Rudog Dietitian will help you understand the significance of your diet to your performance and recovery. You will learn how to adjust your carbs and protein to get the most out of your workouts and minimize injury.  We will also work with you to build a healthy routine of workout, sleep, and recovery.

The Rudog Dietitians are all registered, licensed and clinically trained. They provide customized counseling in many areas including weight loss, diabetes management, post bariatric surgery meal planning, nutrition coaching, menu planning, and more.  We have dietitians that specialize in unique areas such as post bariatric surgery recovery and mixed martial arts.

Thank you for checking us out, we. look forward to working with you. We take many forms of insurance including BCBS, UHC, Cigna, and  some Aetna plans.

Mary Cabral, RD/LD
Owner, Rudog
[email protected]

How to evaluate advertising

It’s extremely important to be able to read supplement advertisements with a critical eye. Your health depends on it! With this article you are going to learn how to decide if a supplement is legitimate or not and what kind of questions are good to ask. First, start with common sense. Ask things like:

  • Does this sound too good to be true?
  • Does the add use lots of fancy terms and make big promises?
  • Is it expensive?

If the answer is “yes” to any of those questions, you should be suspicious. Then, ask more questions like the following:

  • What kind of research was done on the product? Was it done by a company NOT owned by the manufacturer? Was it a double blind study?
  • Has more than one study been done? Did any studies show the product NOT effective?
  • Was any of the research published in MAJOR peer-reviewed science journal (Journal of American Medical Association, Journal of Clinical Nutrition)
  • Is this product being promoted primarily by testimonials instead of scientific research?
  • Have there been any risks or side effects identified with use of the product?
  • Were the studies done on animals or people?

If an advertisement references clinical studies that have been done on their product, they are trying to make it sound like hard core, irrefutable studies have been done. You need to find out.  It’s important to know who PAID for the study to be done.  Results are more believable when studies are paid for and conducted by people who aren’t related to the product being studied. This removes the bias.  For example, if I am Gatorade and I have a new product that is supposed to help people run faster, I want to do research that actually yields this result. I am not interested in research that might say it doesn’t work. So I would do the research and studies myself. Hmmmmm….questionable.  However, I could hire a company to test my product for me.  That would be much less questionable. See the difference?

The design of the study contributes to the validity of the results. It’s important to point out that studies done on animals is cheaper and less complicated than using people. Usually, products have to be tested on animals before they can test on humans.  The bigger the study, the more complicated, the longer, the more control, the better. These are more expensive, though, and take much more time.  A random trial, or study, is preferred. This means the people in the study receiving the product were picked randomly and not pre-selected. Even better is a double blind study.  A double blind study means that the people in the study do not know if they are actually being given the product being tested, as well as the people conducting the study do not know who is being given the actual product. This is the best, but much more complicated and difficult to implement.

When a product has been well tested and has nothing to “hide”, it will be published in scientific journals. Not just magazines, but highly respected journals that are peer reviewed. This is important, because a journal that is peer-reviewed means that very strict criteria have been met by the article before it can be published. It has been reviewed, or looked at, by other professionals and has been thoroughly critiqued. This means the professionals have asked questions about the design of the study and the interpretation of the results. The author(s) of the article have to defend it. Once it is satisfactorily defended, only then will the peer group recommend it for publication. This is really, really important. Journals that do this are probably not ones that you read, but that you have heard of. JAMA, or Journal of the American Medical Association, is one. JCN, or Journal of Clinical Nutrition, is another. Popular magazines do NOT do this.  So, just because you read about something in a muscle or health magazine doesn’t necessarily mean you should accept it as fact. It means you should look for more information to back up what you have read.

Perhaps most importantly, you need to find out if the studies that were done showed any side effects (or death!!)  to use of the product.  Many times studies will say that no serious side effects were experienced after 6 weeks, or 6 months. But it is extremely important to know if there were any side effects after 1 yr, 5 yrs, 10 yrs, and 20 yrs! That means they have to study it for a really long time and spend a LOT of money to do it. That’s why many of the products in the supplement industry are questionable. They have not put the time and money into showing the safety of the product over a long period of time and at variable dosages.

So, based on what you have read here, you should have a pretty good comfort level with being able to assess whether or not a supplement is worth considering.   A few easy ones to start with:

  • Is this too good to be true?
  • Has it been independently studied? On animals or people?
  • How long was it studied for ?
  • What journals has it been published in?
  • Side effects?

When products can show that they have been independently researched, well published, and that the studies have produced consistent results, then you can start to consider them seriously.  Everybody wants a quick answer, but quick is rarely wise.

Vegetable Packets for the Grill

Vegetable Packets for the Grill

Foil VeggiesSaw a really cool idea about how to fix a large quantity of veggies really easily. It involves grilling and a lot of aluminum foil.

First, pick your veggies to grill. This can be ANYTHING. Let’s say you have broccoli, squash, carrots, and green beans. Make a BIG foil packet…..I mean big enough to cover a turkey or chicken. Put the veggies in the foil pack.

Add some butter, like 2 tbsps, or a little canola oil. Season how you like stuff.  Salt and pepper?  Cajun seasoning?  Your choice.

Toss on the grill for about 15 to 20 minutes while you cook some meat or fish. All set!

Can you be a vegetarian MMA fighter?

Are you thinking about changing things up this year? Maybe you are ready for a new way of eating . Maybe you have thought about trying to eat clean all the time.  (Do we really know what “eating clean” means? It seems to be a highly variable definition.) Maybe you have even wondered if becoming vegetarian is a good idea or not. There are definitely  more and more fighters evaluating their diet options, and even departing from their “high protein” ways. Fighters are starting to explore eating styles that have previously been considered non-traditional for MMA, like vegetarianism and veganism.  There are several fighters who are known for their vegetarian and vegan eating styles; Jake Shields, Frank Mir, and Mac Danzig, to name a few.   If you are considering adopting a vegetarian way of eating, you will first have to decide exactly HOW vegetarian you are going to eat.

There are so many variations. Some are super strict (like vegan) and some allow milk and eggs, but not beef and chicken. The type of vegetarianism you decide on will determine what foods you will have to focus on to make sure that you get enough protein and certain vitamins, like calcium, B12, and Iron.

If you are just going to be a straight forward vegetarian, at a minimum, you will not be eating ANY meat, fish, or poultry, dairy, or eggs. The good thing is this generally means that the overall diet will be lower in saturated fat and cholesterol, while higher in fiber, B vitamins and antioxidants. On the other hand, if not well planned, the vegetarian diet can be low or inadequate in B12, Iron, calcium, and omega 3 fatty acids. It becomes important to eat a variety of foods so that over a period of time there aren’t any risks of nutrient deficiencies. Aside from having to make sure that the diet is providing all of the vitamins a fighter needs, it is important to make sure that the diet also provides enough total calories for the amount and type of training a fighter will be doing. The typical MMA fighter needs anywhere from 2000-4000 calories a day. This will depend greatly on height, weight, age, and training level.  Unfortunately, many fighters have no idea how many calories they need to be eating, so they end up eating too few calories. Plus, since they are constantly cutting weight, they are always trying to eat even less.  The vegetarian MMA fighter needs to know exactly what his or her caloric intake should be so that the diet can be designed to meet the need.

Let’s pretend we know a 28 yr old fighter named Jim who wants to become a vegetarian. He is 5ft 8inches and fights at 155 lbs. He used to walk around at 175, but since he has been working with Rudog he doesn’t do that anymore. He has adapted his training and diet to maintain his weight at 160. (He is soooo smart!) Now that he wants to be vegetarian, his diet will definitely change. His calorie needs are estimated to be around 2500 calories per day. Here is what a typical day might look like for him:

Breakfast

  • 1             Whole Wheat English Muffin
  • 1 tbsp    Jelly
  • 1 cup     Orange Juice
  • 1 cup     Mixed fresh fruit topped with coconut flakes

Morning Snack

  • ¼ cup    Homemade trail mix
  • 12 oz      Green tea

Lunch

  • 1            Veggie burger w/lettuce, tomato on whole wheat bun
  • 1 oz        Baked Lays
  • 2 cups    Mixed green salad w/ 1 tbs olive oil and balsamic vinegar

Dinner

  • 2 cups   Spicy tofu with brown rice
  • 2 cups   Steamed veggies
  • 1 cup     Fresh fruit

Evening Snack

  • 2 cups    Popcorn
  • 12 oz      Fruit smoothie made with soy milk

This meal plan ends up providing around 2500 calories, with 63% from carbs, 12% protein, and 25% fat.  If you analyze if for vitamin and mineral content, it will not provide the recommended daily amounts of calcium, vitamin C, iron, B12, and others.  This is because when dairy and eggs are eliminated, it becomes difficult to get those nutrients without some serious menu planning and rotation. Variety in food selection becomes extremely important.  This particular meal plan did not include any dry beans or legumes, but doing so would certainly bump the nutrient value in several categories.  The problem is most guys don’t want to eat beans every day, let alone for every meal. Not to mention the “GI distress” that comes with the territory. Oh, you WILL be gassier as a vegetarian, beans or no beans! That just comes with the territory.  It is generally not a bad idea to take a multivitamin if you are eating vegetarian or vegan. You can also see where getting enough protein every day certainly takes some planning. This meal plan provides 12% and a good range is anywhere from 15-25% for fighters.  A protein supplement would be an option to look at, or just make darn sure that there are high-protein foods consumed every day, like nuts, beans, hummus, egg substitutes, soy, and tofu.  Where you have to be careful is the fat content of the diet. The vegetarian protein sources can be high in fat. It’s definitely a balancing act. If you choose to go the vegetarian route that does include dairy and eggs, it becomes MUCH simpler. The protein and calcium intake is less of a concern.

For the vegan, the challenges are a little more difficult because the food choices are much narrower. It can also become tempting to slide into a routine of eating the same thing all the time. This is certainly convenient, but over time can compromise the nutritional quality of the diet. When variety is limited, vitamin and mineral content is, too. The biggest challenges are getting enough absorbable iron and B12.  These are best absorbed by the body when they are eaten from animal products, so getting them strictly from plant based foods is more difficult. The absorption rate of iron is greatly decreased when it is coming from plant based foods. Without the use of a high quality iron supplement the risk of anemia is high. It’s not a bad idea to have regular blood tests to make sure everything is ok.

Vegetarian diets are definitely possible for MMA athletes and fighters, but they do require a little more pre-planning and food preparation. Here are some things to think about if you are considering going vegetarian:

Pros

  • Lower in saturated fat
  • Higher in fiber
  • Lower in sodium
  • Lower in cholesterol
  • Greater intake of fruits and veggies

Cons

  • The diet can become higher in fat if cheese and dairy are used as main sources of protein and    for flavor
  • Higher dairy intake can increase the intake of saturated fat
  • Foods can be more expensive
  • Fresh foods don’t last long and can be spoil before they are eaten.
  • You will need more time for frequent trips to grocery store and for food preparation.

Any time you are considering a significant diet change, it is a good idea to talk with a registered dietitian just to make sure that the diet is appropriate for you and what your fitness goals are.


Rudog Vitamins are HERE!

I am very excited to announce that Rudog now has 3 brand new supplements available. I am not a personal fan of taking a lot of different pills, but I do believe there are supplements out there that are well worth taking…….I just want it in as few pills as possible and to not cost a fortune. Rudog Right and the Rudog Omega are my answer to just that.

1. Rudog Right   $31   60 capsules (1 time a day)

This vitamin is Right for everyone, men and women. It addresses the daily supplement concerns you have without providing more than you need. It also focuses on cardiovascular, thyroid, metabolism, joint, bone and brain health. All in one capsule. One time a day. It provides CoQ10, Selenium, Chromium Picolinate, Vitamin D3 and more. It is also gluten and citrus free.

 

2. Rudog Omega    $32  40 servings (1 time a day)

A liquid, orange flavored supplement that provides Omega 3 fatty acids and Vitamin D3. Specifically directed at supporting joint, cardiovascular, brain, and immune health.

 

3. Rudog Whey     $50   30 servings (1 scoop a day)

High quality whey protein, easy to mix and not crazy expensive. From pasture fed cows in New Zealand.  This one is unflavored so that it can be used in anything.

The company making these products has been in business for nearly 40 years and is based here in the United States. They guarantee purity and potency, integrity of formulation, and adherence to label claims.  Rudog wouldn’t do business with anyone doing anything less.

 

 

 

Do you NEED a supplement?

Do you NEED a supplement?

Supplement pills

In my kickboxing class the other night there was mention of a supplement called glutathione. The class was encouraged to take it and a brief explanation was given about what glutathione actually is. I could tell that most people had never heard of it and were most likely not going to go look it up… and yet they looked interested in trying it. That is scary. So with that in mind, I wanted to give a little info on how to decide if taking ANY supplement is the right thing for you.

First of all, you should NEVER decide to take a supplement just because someone recommends it. You need to know what the supplement actually IS and what is it SUPPOSED to do. Then you need to evaluate if it is even something you need. Don’t take supplements because you think they will be an “insurance policy” for something. That’s stupid. That can even be dangerous. If you aren’t sure how to evaluate if a particular supplement is a good idea or not, ask a dietitian. If your gym isn’t networked with a dietitian, then look one up on-line yourself. Dietitians are great resources for stuff like this. Check out www.eatright.org for a list of dietitians in your area, or contact Rudog. We work with clients all over the United States. It might cost you a little money, but quality education should cost you something.

Some supplements have only been shown to be effective if the person taking them is deficient in that substance already. So, for example, if you aren’t deficient in chromium, a chromium supplement will probably not have the positive effect you are expecting. As a consumer, you wouldn’t necessarily know that. That is exactly why you talk to a professional. They know things you don’t. You get my point. You need to know what you are taking and why you are taking it.

After you do your homework and you know all you need to know about a supplement, you have to answer the tough question, “Do I NEED this?” If you don’t need it, don’t take it. Put your time and your money toward things you DO need. If you decide you could benefit from the supplement, then get with a physician or dietitian to determine what the proper dosage is going to be for you. Just because “Steve” takes a certain amount, doesn’t mean that is the right dose for you.

Most supplements do not have negative side effects when taken at the right dosage, but it is a largely unregulated industry and the FDA does not require (or even have) RDA’s for many supplements. You want to be sure you are not taking more of something than you need, but you also want to make sure you are getting enough to produce the desired result. This is where a physician or dietitian is really handy. They can also ask you specific questions to make sure that the supplement isn’t going to interfere with,or work against, anything else you may already be taking, regardless of whether it’s prescription or over the counter.

Supplements can be a wonderful addition to a great diet and a great workout regimen, but they can be a waste if they aren’t used correctly. Don’t waste money or time because you are too lazy to do a little bit of research. Get smart, you are worth it.

As a professional in this industry, I have done much of the homework for you. Rudog has developed a small line of supplements that give you everything you need, in the right amount. Visit our page for more information.

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Mary Cabral, RD/LD
Rudog, Owner
[email protected]

 

You can schedule your ZOOM Bariatric Nutrition Class by clicking HERE  

Classes are offered at 2:00 and 4:30 every Monday, 2:00 every Wednesday, or 12:00 every Thursday.

We can't wait for you to join us!